eLearning, Instructional Design

Not Quite Flipped

We are hearing a lot about “flipped classrooms” these days. Often times, when I begin working with instructors to create or develop their first online course, they very quickly assimilate the two: flipped classroom teaching and teaching online.

There are similarities for certain: technology is used as a tool to disseminate information, multimedia and simulations are viewed “at home” to help to develop conceptual understanding, etc. However, the instructor invariably feels “stuck” when the next part of flipped teaching arrives: engaging students in classroom discussions and activities.

The good news is that for those who have never taught online, the flipped classroom is a very comfortable “jumping off point.” The instructor as facilitator is something online and flipped have in common. The shift in approach and the types of activities are different. In fact, way you design these activities should be framed or structured differently, taking into account your audience (adult learning, working professionals, high school students, etc.), synchronous or asynchronous course environments as well as other limitations and opportunities.

When designing online discussion board assignments consider the prompt carefully. You will not have the opportunity to revise it, if students “don’t get it.” In an online classroom blank stares are to computer screens. You will never see them.

Also, don’t rule out group work – papers, projects or presentations require student collaboration and engagement with the material. There is no doubt that many students, online or in a traditional classroom, will dread working in groups, but it is an effective tool.

You may combine the group concept with a discussion board assignment too. Perhaps require that the students suggest that week’s discussion topic – requiring their engagement upfront – then designate a host for the discussion, requiring the students to intimately interact with the material and lead their fellow classmates in a discussion. All the while, you can facilitate the conversation and the pathway for engagement.

Today, An Ethical Island posted an interesting infographic about the flipped teaching for the online environment, check it out!

Infographic from An Ethical Island blog post, “Flipping Online- Maintaining the In-Class Feel” (http://anethicalisland.wordpress.com/2013/07/19/flipping-online-maintaining-the-in-class-feel/)

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One thought on “Not Quite Flipped

  1. Pingback: Flip Your Classroom | AzLA College and University Libraries Division Blog

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